Atmospheric Emission License Applications

   
Description

Air pollution affects everyone and normally occurs when there is a change in the composition of the ambient air. This can be caused by smoke, dust, gases, fumes, aerosols and odorous substances.

Possible sources of air pollution include transportation, power generation, industries and domestic sources. These can cause harm to one’s health. Scientific research has proved that air emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and other emission sources are largely responsible for increasing the temperature of the atmosphere and that if not controlled, the warning of the atmosphere and the earth's surface will result in global warming, which has dire consequences on human health and the environment.

The National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act (Act No. 39 of 2004) defines air quality that is not harmful to health and well-being through ambient air quality standards.

This act provides for the regulatory tools, e.g. AEL licensing, and mandates for government to deliver the desired outcomes in terms of managing air quality. Industrial processes which may have an adverse impact on ambient air quality have been categorised as listed activities.  It is the responsibility of organisations or industry to check against the following broad description of activities (link below), to assess if an application for an AEL must be submitted to the relevant authority for processing and final approval.
Air pollution affects everyone and normally occurs when there is a change in the composition of the ambient air. This can be caused by smoke, dust, gases, fumes, aerosols and odorous substances.

Possible sources of air pollution include transportation, power generation, industries and domestic sources. These can cause harm to one’s health. Scientific research has proved that air emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and other emission sources are largely responsible for increasing the temperature of the atmosphere and that if not controlled, the warning of the atmosphere and the earth's surface will result in global warming, which has dire consequences on human health and the environment.

The National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act (Act No. 39 of 2004) defines air quality that is not harmful to health and well-being through ambient air quality standards.

This act provides for the regulatory tools, e.g. AEL licensing, and mandates for government to deliver the desired outcomes in terms of managing air quality. Industrial processes which may have an adverse impact on ambient air quality have been categorised as listed activities.  It is the responsibility of organisations or industry to check against the following broad description of activities (link below), to assess if an application for an AEL must be submitted to the relevant authority for processing and final approval.

Supporting Documents

AEL activity description

Steps involved in the application for an AEL

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Office of the Premier 
Private Bag X5016 
Kimberley 
8301

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